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6th Early Music Festival: Into The Winds / The Perfect Dance

Cultural, Concert, Lyrical arts, Classical music in Saorge
  • We experience a hypnotic state of trance when we feel the delicious urge to let ourselves go on the dancefloor, yesterday's dancer and today's listener, as the first dances are notated, like the minstrels' wank in Henry III...

  • With : Annabelle Guibeaud, recorders, chalemie, douçaines, direction - Adrien Reboisson, chalemie, bombards, recorders, douçaines - Marion le Moal, recorders, bombard, douçaines - Rémi Lécorché, sackbut, slide trumpet, busine, recorders - Laurent Sauron, percussions

    "The perfect dance is the memory, the measure, the manner, the body holding, the diversity of things and the sharing of space...". So begins one of the first dance treatises in history, written in the 15th century by the...
    With : Annabelle Guibeaud, recorders, chalemie, douçaines, direction - Adrien Reboisson, chalemie, bombards, recorders, douçaines - Marion le Moal, recorders, bombard, douçaines - Rémi Lécorché, sackbut, slide trumpet, busine, recorders - Laurent Sauron, percussions

    "The perfect dance is the memory, the measure, the manner, the body holding, the diversity of things and the sharing of space...". So begins one of the first dance treatises in history, written in the 15th century by the Italian dance master Antonio Cornazzano. This programme follows the thread of the first notated dances, exploring also the songs or pieces that were sometimes the source as well as the more refined compositions that were inspired by them.

    At the court of Burgundy, radiant with splendour and vitality, the aristocracy was fascinated by the noble basse-danse, which seemed to build a bridge between the land of men and the kingdom of the gods, while the dancing masters in Italy wrote their first treatises.

    It was during the Renaissance, at the time of the birth of the musical printing press in Venice, that dance music was to be disseminated in abundance in Europe. Extraordinary accounts of balls and magnificence testify to society's interest in entertainment and celebration. The short, repetitive phrases of the branles sounded by Henry III's minstrels help to draw the dancer of yesterday and the listener of today into a hypnotic state of trance... which we can all experience when we get the delicious urge to let ourselves go on the dancefloor... !
  • Environment
    • Village centre
  • Spoken languages
    • French
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